Kirsten Dunst is the perfect poster girl for spring slip on loafers

Good news for loafer lovers, there’s a new relaxed style on the scene for spring. The backless model provides slip-on ease, avoids the issue of feet swelling in the heat and truly embodies the term ‘loafing around’. Kirsten Dunst has already got in on the action.

Stepping out for coffee in her native LA, the actress teamed a floral tea dress and cardigan with a pair of Gucci slip-ons. The Princetown slipper, which retails for £380, is an adaptation of the Jordaan loafer, brought in by Alessandro Michele as a modern update on Gucci’s classic Horsebit style.

For Gucci fans wavering between the Jordaan and Princetown, Michele is already one step ahead of you. Some of the coloured Jordaan’s feature a collapsible back so the loafer can moonlight as a slipper too.

Back to Kirsten. The 33-year-old might have been wearing her signature ditsy-dress-and-cardy uniform, but brought it bang up-to-date with those black slippers. The lesson? If you buy one pair of transitional shoes now, make it a pair of slip-ons.

See backless loafers, as worn by Dunst, as part of your off-duty

Fashion foodward

Hot attire for outdoor dining at the Taste and beyond

1 Grace Lehto

8, student and birthday celebrator, Lansing, Mich.

Tell me about your outfit: “My grandma (Grandma Rose) got a dress for me for my birthday.”

Do you feel comfortable? (shyly) “Yeah.”

Pretty? “Yeah.”

How else do you feel? “Happy.”

And the pink backpack? “My grandma (Grandma Lehto) made it to hold my (American Girl) doll.”

The back story: It’s a family tradition. Ken and Kelly Lehto have taken each of their three daughters — Grace is the youngest — to Chicago for their 8th birthdays and a shopping trip to the American Girl store.

Why it works: A little girl in a sundress always rocks.

2 Joyce Tam

21, graduate student, Chicago

Opening statement: “I just prefer skirts in the summer. It’s a fun season for clothing. … When spring and summer roll around, my wardrobe gets a lot more comfortable.” (She sewed the skirt herself!)

Why it works: Cute flats are comfy. (Target, bought

Wow blouses four shirt styles to buy this spring

6 f

Simple shirt? Forget it. This season’s button-ups are bold, blinging and bound to get you noticed.

Ruffle up

Let busy frills sit against a simple denim canvas. We love the contrast of boyfriend jeans with ladylike accessories, such as a top handle bag and low-block pumps.

Granny chic

For a maximalist SS16 look mix and match contrasting prints on blouses and pencil skirts. Choose one base note to co-ordinate accessories with.

Retro

Tuck a patterned pussy-bow blouse into high-waisted flared jeans for a classic retro vibe. Accompany with a suede shoulder bag and platforms.

Pop a collar

Embellished collars are an easy way to translate the trend into workwear. Wear with wide-legged trousers, and let the collars peep out over crew-neck knits in the cold.

Decoding Claire Underwood power wardrobe in House Of Cards

House of Cards is back. We repeat back! The fourth season of the sitcom, celebrated for its dirty politics and loaded dialogue, is about to hit Netflix. Fans are expecting answers to the big question: will Claire really walk away from President Francis Underwood? And, if so, what (immaculate and stylish) shoes will the First Lady be wearing as she does so?

Stylist Kemal Harris, who took over styling Claire Underwood last season, has posted a picture of the moodboard that has inspired her new season costumes. Featuring photographer Lee Miller’s portraits and the Dior archive shots, we can surmise that Claire’s wardrobe will follow the same ‘timeless, decisive and feminine’ mantra her stylists have carefully created across three season.

Tom Broecker was Underwood’s first costume designer – winning two nominations at the 2013 Costume Designers Guild Awards for his work creating the ultimate on-screen power wardrobe.  “With her character we really wanted to have this armoured, tailored, right, nothing out of place feel,” he’s previously told Elle of working on House of Cards set.

The result was a host of outfits from Prada, L’Wren Scott, Armani and Theory that looked polished and barely veered from a simple palette of black, grey

Five fashion flops for summer interviews

My daughter is between her junior and senior years in college and has several office job interviews scheduled for summer employment. Ihave been working in offices for a number of years and hear criticism about how some of the young women dress when they come in looking for employment. Can you back me up? — T.A.L.

Best-selling career development author Vicky Oliver (vickyoliver.com) can help you out. Oliver says you’re spot on, Mom. The New York-based image consultant and career coach spotlights five forget-me-fast fashion goofs when dressing for summer job interviews:

— TONE DOWN NAILS. For a summer position, your nails don’t belong in the Museum of Modern Art. Four nails on one hand in turquoise and one nail in rose adorned with sparkles are too creative for most office environments. You don’t want your interviewer mesmerized more by your fingertips than by what comes out of your mouth.

— COVER UP. Women should avoid tiny tank tops, sheer blouses with lacy underwear and hemlines that show leg and more leg. For men, leave muscle tees, unbuttoned shirts and shorts at home. Cleavage, arm muscles, chest hair or midriffs work for a tiki bar, but not

How to wear the challenging colour that is cream

Hard to believe I know, but there’s an omerta observed by fashion editors (well, the newspaper-we’re-too-busy-filing-copy-to-care ones at any rate) that you should never try too hard at the shows. Why? Because nothing looks more row 5, than rocking up, head to toe in the season’s latest trends. Architectural ruffles or this spring’s off the shoulder top? As if.  More like, which of my many, many navy sweaters will I be digging out today?

But change is afoot: cream, once associated with bad British teeth, bad Kim Kardashian or the sort of Russian limo dressing suggestive of a life of wall to wall gophers and a devil may care attitude to your dry-cleaning bill is out in force on the frow.

If I’m being truthful, it’s the decadence of wearing cream that makes it so very appealing: it’s a two finger salute to my three year old’s grubby hands.  I know that my Harris Wharf coat is constantly dicing with a chocolate smeared fate but it’s worth it for the ‘ta-dah’ factor that wearing cream – even on pale, pasty complexions bestows.

For yes, cream is a challenge:  when wearing the aforementioned coat, I do

Martin Kaymer handles his nerves to win Open in shot rout

Martin Kaymer arrived at Pinehurst No. 2 on Sunday afternoon and ducked into the clubhouse with everything he could have asked for. Three days of masterful golf had given Kaymer a five-shot cushion in the U.S. Open and the needed confidence to close out his second major.

But Kaymer also knew what came with that.

The spotlight. The nerves. The pressure.

So he forecast for caddie Craig Connolly what they were in for.

This round will be very, very difficult,” Kaymer warned. “Probably the toughest round we have ever played. It’s the expectations you have on yourself and those that other people have as well. It’s very difficult to go through that, playing on a different continent.”

Kaymer knew he would face an early stretch of holes that would quickly shape his round. He knew his brain would be more active than usual.

“The challenge today was not to think too much about the trophy,” he said, “not to think too much about sitting (after the round) and what you’re going to say, not to think too much about how you’re going to celebrate on 18. It goes through your head.”

hourglass chic feted at Paris fashion museum

When Christian Dior introduced his debut haute couture collection in February 1947, the meters of fabric spilling over the models’ hips in swirls of fine wool, silk and tulle were nothing short of a fashion revolution.

His emblematic creations ushered in “the most luxurious and radiant” decade in women’s fashion, according to Olivier Saillard, director of the Palais Galliera fashion museum, which presents “The 50s – Fashion in France, 1947-1957” beginning on Saturday in Paris.

Drawing on the museum’s extensive archive of garments and accessories, the exposition stars not only Dior but also such greats as Balenciaga, Pierre Balmain and Hubert de Givenchy. Along with them are less familiar though no less important names like Jacques Fath and Jacques Heim.

“This was haute couture’s golden age, when Paris regained its title of world fashion capital,” said Saillard, who on Wednesday night – during haute couture fashion week in Paris – gathered the couturiers of today for a gala dinner and advance peek at the show.

Dresses for cocktail hours, balls, lazy summer afternoons – even gloves, hats, brassieres and swimsuits – all make an elegant appearance under the ornate ceiling of the Palais Galliera,

How to get the sports luxe look without wearing actual gym gear

If, like us, the term ‘athleisure’ is causing you to look questioningly at the gym kit you haven’t used in months, fret not, your leggings can stay where they are. This trend is all about luxe sports wear that will never venture near a treadmill, but sit in harmony with the rest of your wardrobe. Here are five subtle and considered ways to show your active side…

Show your stripes

Look for narrow lines down the edge of trousers for that race-ready look normally associated with tracksuits. Not only do the vertical lines elongate the leg area, they don’t look out of place when paired with smarter accoutrements up top. Serious sports fans should look for bold, contrasting coloured stripes that can be matched to accessories.

Join the cult

Fashion insider brand Vetements has taken the AW16 fashion week circuit by storm with its sports basics.  Its hoodies riff on athletic brand Champion’s logo and have found themselves on editors who normally stick to sharp suiting. If you can’t quite picture yourself donning the teenage boy’s favourite, swap hoodies for a crew-neck sport tee with subtle branding.

Find your trainer tribe

Still wavering on the brink

Leave shoulder pads to football field

Dear Mary Anne E.: Shoulder pads are out of fashion right now. They’ll be back. Everything comes back. (Platform shoes, maxi dresses, demure lady purses to name but three.) However, at this fashion moment, you’ll want to lose the pads. “Yank those bad boys out. Then insert them into your bra for a little boost,” advised fashion expert Susan Swimmer, who was only half kidding. “Reuse, recycle.” Swimmer, contributing fashion features editor for More magazine and my go-to resource when it comes to practical advice on what to wear, said you occasionally still find garments with shoulder pads in stores (mostly in structured jackets). But she says to remove the pads when you get your jacket home. As for the shirttail issue, both curved and straight are fine. But, either way, you do not want it to hit mid-butt since that’s the widest part of most women and an area that most of us would prefer not to call to anybody’s attention. A great alternative and more forgiving over pants is a tunic (curved or straight hem) that’s fingertip length.

Dear Answer Angel Ellen: I understand that the new iPhone is going to be larger than the

Fashion for the ages

Timeless tips for everyone from new grads to the newly pregnant to the newly retired

If your fashion curiosity runs deeper than a desire to revisit the skeletons in Carrie’s closet in the new “Sex and the City” movie, kick off your heels in a lawn chair and wrap your hands around three new fashion advice books. Packed with solutions for everyone from new graduates to the newly pregnant to the newly retired, these volumes just might put new polish on an entire population of women.

Back boobs, be gone

Back boobs, melon calves, kissing thighs, menopots and Buddha bellies — Charla Krupp’s new book, “How to Never Look Fat Again: Over 1,000 Ways to Dress Thinner — Without Dieting!” (Springboard Press, $26.99) trots out all the current disparaging terms for less-than-perfect bodies. But then she sets out to make sure those terms are never applied to you.

The “Summer” chapter recommends making a uniform of three looks: white or khaki pants with a crisp tunic; summer-weight cashmere V-necks or long cardigans in yummy colors over body-shaper camisoles, bare tops or dresses; and a fresh dress in a pretty pattern. One vow for summer,

Banned headphones a World Cup fashion beat

Neymar likes them Brazil-green. England’s Wayne Rooney, white. Luis Suarez, blue.

Banned from the pitch by FIFA for licensing reasons, the bulky Beats headphones are a favorite for many of the world’s top players, making the World Cup a huge unofficial ad for the company acquired by Apple Inc last month.

The colorful high-end headphones created by rapper Dr Dre have become a ubiquitous soccer accessory.

Neymar wore them as he stepped off the bus at the Castelao stadium of Fortaleza for Brazil’s last training season on the eve of their match with Mexico on Tuesday.

Suarez had them wrapped around his neck as he joked with his Uruguay team mates during a break at a recent practice.

But soccer world governing body FIFA’s licensing agreement with rival electronics maker Sony Corp means players have to take them off when they are in World Cup stadiums for official matches and media events.

Marketing experts say that probably only amplifies their appeal.

“When fans see World Cup athletes wearing Beats in their downtime, by choice, it has as much impact as seeing them lace their Adidas (boots) or sip a sponsored beverage,”

Belgium ousts dramatic fashion

Seabiscuit pulled up lame on the backstretch. Kirk Gibson’s long drive died on the warning track.

After a remarkable underdog run through four games and one overtime period, the U.S. soccer team’s World Cup magic finally ran out in the round of 16 Tuesday with a 2-1 loss to Belgium.

The first goal came three minutes into extra time after Belgium’s Romelu Lukaku pushed past Matt Besler along the right touchline, raced into the penalty area alone and sent the ball forward for Kevin De Bruyne, who spun away from two defenders and rolled the ball into the far corner.

And with the U.S. pushing hard for the tying goal Lukaku, who didn’t come off the bench until the 91st minute, added what appeared to be an insurance goal on a counterattack near the end of the first 15-minute overtime.

That goal proved to be important, though, when U.S. teenager Julian Green beat Belgium’s all-world goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois on a right-footed volley just seconds after stepping on to a World Cup field for the first.

The only other goal Courtois has allowed in Brazil came on a penalty kick in Belgium’s first game.